Blog, Interrupted

My brand new, totally revamped blog! I will bring back a couple of entries from about the time when I announced my book deal, but other than that, it's all new. 

Resources for Young Writers

I've done it! I've rescued this page from my old blog. I hope it's helpful for some bright-eyed young writers (and maybe some older ones) out there.

Resources for Young Writers

Many of these resources are useful for all writers, but I've compiled this list for young writers. It includes literary magazines that publish young adult stories, literary magazine search tools, resources for writing query letters, and info on researching literary agents and finding critique partners. I hope it's useful!

Literary Magazines that Publish Young Adult Stories

Balloons Lit. Journal for ages 12+

Blue Marble Review 13-20

Cicada YA

Creating Iris 14-17

Cricket 9-14

Ember: A Journal of Luminous Things 10-18

Girls Right the World female-identified writers and artists, ages 14 +

One Teen Story 13-19

YARN Young Adult Review Network

Youth Imagination Magazine

Literary Magazine Search Tools

https://duotrope.com/ (not free)

https://www.submishmash.com/

https://www.pw.org/literary_magazines

Resources for Writing Query Letters

http://queryshark.blogspot.com/

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/how-to-write-the-perfect-query-letter

https://janefriedman.com/query-letters/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/09/query-letter-_n_2434095.html

Researching Literary Agents

http://www.agentquery.com/default.aspx

http://www.manuscriptwishlist.com/

http://www.publishersmarketplace.com/

http://www.writersdigestshop.com/browse-by-product/market-books?r=wdfooterwmbooks

(Writer's Market books)

  • While querying agents, a helpful tool to keep track of your queries is querytracker, but it isn't free, and you can use a spreadsheet to track the same info. Just don't make any mistakes. Some agencies have rules about not contacting two agents at the same agency about the same manuscript and it can be hard to keep all of that information organized. query tracker is extremely helpful.
  • If you want to take some online classes in publishing, one option is http://manuscriptacademy.com/ (also not free, but allows you to sign up for query and page critiques and pitch sessions with agents--do NOT do this without a polished manuscript, and check if there are age restrictions)
  • There are a zillion writing and publishing blogs out there, but this one is my favorite: http://kidlit.com/ It's written and maintained by Mary Kole, a former literary agent who is now a freelance editor, who I've actually worked with. There are also a zillion freelance editors out there, and like blogs, some are much better than others. Mary is really good. But at this stage the most valuable thing is a good set of critique partners or beta readers.
  • Critique partner resources!
    • http://www.writersdigest.com/tip-of-the-day/the-top-3-critique-questions-you-should-ask-a-reviewer
    • https://thewritelife.com/ultimate-guide-to-beta-readers/

Okay, that's enough for tonight... I'll add more resources soon.

Until then, I will be answering any questions on twitter @MsDanaMele

or on my Goodreads author page